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World's First Inhalable COVID-19 Vaccine Approved in China

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 06 Sep 2022

CanSino Biologics Inc. (Tianjin, China) has received approval from the National Medical Products Administration of China (NMPA) for Convidecia Air, its recombinant COVID-19 vaccine (Adenovirus Type 5 Vector) for inhalation to be used as a booster dose.

Utilizing the same adenovirus vector technological platform as the company's intramuscular version Convidecia, Convidecia Air provides a non-invasive option that uses a nebulizer to change liquid into an aerosol for inhalation through the mouth. Convidecia Air is needle-free and can effectively induce comprehensive immune protection in response to SARS-CoV-2 after just one breath. Studies have indicated that Convidecia Air can induce strong humoral, cellular and mucosal immunity to achieve triple protection and effectively contain the infection and spread of the virus.


Image: The Convidecia Air inhalable COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for use as a booster dose (Photo courtesy of Pexels)
Image: The Convidecia Air inhalable COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for use as a booster dose (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Related Links:
CanSino Biologics Inc. 


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